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My nowne Iohn poyntz . sins ye delight to know

1 Leave a comment on paragraph 1 0 85v-87r

2 Leave a comment on paragraph 2 0 f. [85v]

3 Leave a comment on paragraph 3 0 1    My nowne Iohn poyntz . sins ye delight to know
2    that{{th}+t+} cawsse why that homeward I me drawe
3    Ande fle the presse of courtes{es} wher soo they goo

4 Leave a comment on paragraph 4 0 4    Rathar then to lyve . thrall vnder the awe
5    of lordly lokes wrappid with{w+t+}in my cloke
6    to will & lust lerning to set A lawe

5 Leave a comment on paragraph 5 0 7    It is not for becawsse I skorne or moke
8    the{{th}+e+} powar of them / to whome fortune hath lent
9    charge over vs / of Right to strike the stroke

6 Leave a comment on paragraph 6 0 10    But trwe it is / that I have allwais ment
11    lesse to estime them then the com{_o}mon sort
12    off owtward thinges{es} that Iuge in their{{th}+er+} intent

7 Leave a comment on paragraph 7 0 13    with{w+t+}owt Regarde what dothe inwarde resort
14    I grawnt sumtime that of glorye the fyar
15    dothe twyche my hart / my lyst not to report

8 Leave a comment on paragraph 8 0 16    blame by . honowr / And honour to desyar
17    but how may I this honour now Atayne
18    that{{th}+t+} cannot dy the coloure blake A lyer

9 Leave a comment on paragraph 9 0 19    My poyntz I cannot from me tune to fayne
20    to cloke the trothe / for praisse with{w+t+}owt desart
21    of them that lyst all vice for to retayne

10 Leave a comment on paragraph 10 0 22    I camot{cannot} honour them that{{th}+t+} settes{es} their part
23    with{w+t+} venus And baccus all theire lyf long
24    nor holld my pece / of them allthoo I smart

11 Leave a comment on paragraph 11 0 25    II cannot crowche nor knelle . to do so grete A wrong
26    to worship them lyke gode . on erthe Alone
27    thar ar As wollffes{es} thes sely lambes{es}  among

12 Leave a comment on paragraph 12 0 28    I cannot speke and loke lyke A saynct
29    vse willes{es} for witt / & make deceyt A plesure
30    And call crafft coumsell{counsel} for proffet styll to paint

13 Leave a comment on paragraph 13 0 f. [86r]

14 Leave a comment on paragraph 14 0 31    I Cannot wrest the law / to fill the coffer
32    with{w+t+} innocent blode to fede my sellff ffat
33    ande doo most hurt / where most hellp I offer

15 Leave a comment on paragraph 15 0 34    I am not he that can / Alow the state
35    off him Cesar / And dam cato to dye
36    that with{w+t+} is dethe / dyd skape owt off the gate

16 Leave a comment on paragraph 16 0 37    From Cesares{es} handes{es} if lyve donnot lye
38    ande wolld not lyve / whar lyberty was lost
39    so dyd is hart the comonn wele aplye

17 Leave a comment on paragraph 17 0 40    I am not he shuch eloquence to boste
41    to make the crow singing As the swane
42    nor call the lyond of cowardes{es} bestes{es}  the moste

18 Leave a comment on paragraph 18 0 43    That cannot take A mous / As the cat can
44    ande he that dithe / for hungar of the golld
45    call him Alessaundre . And say that pan

19 Leave a comment on paragraph 19 0 46    Passithe Apollo in musike many folld
47    praysse syr thopias for A nobyll talle
48    and skorne the story that the knyght tolld

20 Leave a comment on paragraph 20 0 49    PPraysse him for counsell / that{{th}+t+} is drounkin of alle Ale
50    gryn when he lawghes{es} that berithe all the{{th}+e+} swaye
51    frowne when he frownes{es} / & grone when he is pale

21 Leave a comment on paragraph 21 0 52    On others lust to hang bothe night & daye
53    None of thes poyntes{es} wolld neuer{u’} frame in me
54    my wyt is nowght I cannot leane the wey

22 Leave a comment on paragraph 22 0 55    Ande myche the lesse of thinges{es} that greter{t’} be
56    that{{th}+t+} asken hellp of colours of deuysse
57    to Ioyne the mene / with{w+t+} eche extremyte

23 Leave a comment on paragraph 23 0 58    Wwith{w+t+}  the nyryst vartwe to cloke Allway the{{th}+e+} vise
59    ande as to porposse / lyke wisse yt shall fall
60    to presse the vertwe that{{th}+t+} it may not Ryse

24 Leave a comment on paragraph 24 0 f. [86v]

25 Leave a comment on paragraph 25 0 61    As dronkennesse good fellyship to call
62    the frendly foo with{w+t+} is dobill face
63    say he is gentill and cowrtesse there{{th}+er+}with{w+t+}all

26 Leave a comment on paragraph 26 0 64    And say that favell hathe A goodly grace
65    in eloquence . and crwelte to name
66    zelle of Iustice and chaunge in time & place

27 Leave a comment on paragraph 27 0 67    And he that suffrith offence with{w+t+}owt blame
68    call hm him pytyfull & him trwe & plaine
69    that raylyth rekles to euer{u’}y mans shame

28 Leave a comment on paragraph 28 0 70    Say he is Rude that cannot ly & faine
71    the leccher A louor / and tyranny
72    to be the Right of A pryncis Rayne

29 Leave a comment on paragraph 29 0 73    I cannot I :. no no :. yt will not be1
74    this ys the cawsse that I wolld neuer{u’} yet
75    hang on their{{th}+er+} slyves / that{{th}+t+}waye as thow may se

30 Leave a comment on paragraph 30 0 76    A chyp of chaunce more then A pound of wit
77    this makithe me Att home to hunt and hawke
78    And in fowlle wether At my boke to syt

31 Leave a comment on paragraph 31 0 79    In frost & snow then with{w+t+} my bow to stalke
80    no man dothe marke whereso I ryde or go
81    In lustie lees at libretie I walke.

32 Leave a comment on paragraph 32 0 82    And of theire newis I fele no wele nor woo.
83    Save that a clogg dothe hang yet at my hele /
84    no force for that for it is ordred so.

33 Leave a comment on paragraph 33 0 85    That I maye leape / bothe hedge and diche full wele.
86    I am not now in fraunce to Iudge the wyne
87    what saverye sauce theis delicates{es} to fele

34 Leave a comment on paragraph 34 0 88    Nor yet in{_i} spaine where on must him{_i}  incline
89    rather then{_e} to be vtterlye to seme
90    I meddle not with{w+t+} wyttes{es}that{{th}+t+} be so fine

35 Leave a comment on paragraph 35 0 f. [87r]

36 Leave a comment on paragraph 36 0 91    No flaunders{d’} cherere lettes{es} not me sight to deme
92    of blak and whit nor takes{es} my wyt awaye
93    with{w+t+} bestelynesse they bestes{es} do esteme

37 Leave a comment on paragraph 37 0 94    Nor I am not where christ is gyven in praye
95    for momnye{money}  / poison / and treson at rome
96    a Com{_o}mon{_o}pra{p’}ctise vsid2 night and daye

38 Leave a comment on paragraph 38 0 97    But here I am in kent . and christendome
98    amonges{es} the muses where I rede and Ryme
99    where if thou list my poyzz for to come
100    Thou shalte be Iudge I howe I do spende my tyme

39 Leave a comment on paragraph 39 0 fs

Notes & Glosses

40 Leave a comment on paragraph 40 0 1. The midline dots are pyramidal.
2. The scribe reverts to his habitual spelling practice of ‘id’ suffixes.

Commentary

41 Leave a comment on paragraph 41 0 Attributed to Sir Thomas Wyatt (Rebholz 1978, 186-189), this poem was entered by H8. The poem also appears in Tottel’s Miscellany under the title “Of the Courtiers life written to Iohn Poins” (item 125) (2010, 98-100). For his lyric, Wyatt adapted Luigi Alamanni’s satire Io ui diro (c. 1532). John Poyntz was a member of Henry VIII’s court and was in all probability Wyatt’s friend. Rebholz mentions that this poem was probably written after Wyatt was released from prison in 1536 (1978, 438-439). H8 groups three poems that make allusions to the abuse of power of those who rule and to deceitful friends. Two other poems in the manuscript personify Desire as well: in “Cruell desire my master and my foo” (73r) the speaker speaks out against the tyrannical ruler Desire, and in “Greting to you bothe yn hertye wyse” (79r) the speaker cautions against false supporters. In “My nowne Iohn poyntz,” the narrator protests directly against the tyranny of power and the lack of freedom of subjects; he prefers to isolate himself in the country away from the flattering, deceitful court. H8 seems conscious of the structure of the poem and emphasizes the terza rima form, though inconsistently, by using capital letters of differing sizes to mark stanza divisions. The scribe also seems to plan out the transcription of this lengthy poem by copying 30 lines on each page. Three lines that appear in other witnesses between lines 27 and 28 are omitted in this particular version.

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